Midwinter in the SEQ garden

Midwinter gardening for households in south-east Queensland

AllRound Tree Services loves a garden full of beautiful shrubs and trees. Here we offer our midwinter tips for maximising the good looks and health of your garden plants.

Midwinter pruning

As we move from the early to late winter transition time, it is time to take some management actions in your garden to make the most of things for summer.

It is a good time to prune hedges of common types, such as lillypilly, duranta and murraya paniculata. Shrubs that flower in summer can also be trimmed about now to stimulate flower growth and control the shape. This includes hibiscus, camellias and azaleas, as well as Bauhinia galpinii, Abutilon, Odontonema strictum, Ruttya fruticosa and Solanum rantonnetii.

Midwinter fertilising and watering

Now is also a good time to fertilise, although it is important to remember to water before and after. This is our driest time of year, and westerly winds can exacerbate the stress on weaker plants.

Don’t fertilise on dry soil. It can be wasteful, or even damaging to your precious plants, especially the shallow-rooted ones. If you are concerned about the cost of water or about any water restrictions, it is better to wait until the first decent rains.

Remember, too, that it is especially important to keep fertiliser that is high in phosphorous away from your sensitive natives such as grevilleas and banksias.

Winter weeding

Weed now without delay, to prevent your weeds from setting seed for summer. That goes for bindii and any other weeds that are common in your garden. Control now will stop them proliferating in the warmer months.

Frangipani cuttings

Mid to late winter is an ideal time to take cuttings from frangipani. Rest them after they are cut in a shady place for a couple of weeks. This will allow the ends to seal. After that you can pot them or place them directly in the ground, where they can instantly landscape your garden.

Enjoy!

And contact us today for all your shrub and tree maintenance needs.

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